ACELG

The Dutch last-minute criticism of Romanian and Bulgarian access to its labour market shows how it still pays off for a national government to attack a European decision that it voted for, even long after the decision was taken and when it is clear that it cannot be reversed. By Maarten Hillebrandt The Dutch debate… » read more

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The recent revelation about the scope of surveillance has been shocking even for national leaders, who are generally aware of secret national security programmes and their implications. But the debate should also focus on another very important point: the responsibility of our legislators. By Vigjilenca Abazi The revelation of NSA surveillance brings a new dimension… » read more

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The demand to transfer powers from the EU back to the national level is politically en-vogue in several EU Member States at the moment. EU policy on agricultural biotechnology, however, is an interesting exception. The Council of Ministers has recently deadlocked[1] a Commission legislative proposal to re-nationalise parts of EU legislation on the cultivation of… » read more

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Secrecy is universally appealing. And understandably so: it conceals what individuals and organizations care most to protect: “the dangerous, the shameful, the source of power”. Yet, even in democracies there often seems a legitimate need for at least some secrecy in decision-making. Where does the need for secrecy come from in the European Union and… » read more

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The draft accession agreement has many objectionable features. Never has the citizens’ perspective been the EU concern during negotiations. Diplomatic secretiveness, an exceptional treatment of the European Court of Justice in honour of its claimed constitutional ‘prerogatives’ (the ‘prior involvement’ procedure), and the complications of a ‘co-respondent mechanism’, resulted naturally. And yet, accession would be… » read more

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